Artem Kasyanov

Artem Kasyanov

Personal information

Full name
Artem Andriyovych Kasyanov

Date of birth
(1983-04-20) 20 April 1983 (age 33)

Place of birth
Stakhanov, Ukrainian SSR, Soviet Union

Height
1.82 m (5 ft 11 1⁄2 in)

Playing position
Defensive midfielder

Club information

Current team

Zhetysu

Number
12

Youth career

1998–2000
Dynamo Stakhanov

Senior career*

Years
Team
Apps
(Gls)

2000–2002
FC Stal-2 Alchevsk
37
(4)

2002–2007
Stal Alchevsk
115
(12)

2007–2008
Metalurh Donetsk
9
(0)

2008–2009
Kharkiv
20
(1)

2009–2010
Chornomorets Odessa
2
(0)

2010–2015
Ordabasy
149
(21)

2016
Metalist Kharkiv
5
(0)

2016–
Zhetysu
17
(2)

National team‡

2003
Ukraine U-21
1
(0)

* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 31 October 2016.
‡ National team caps and goals correct as of 7 June 2016

Artem Kasyanov (Ukrainian: Артем Андрійович Касьянов; born 20 April 1983 in Stakhanov) is a Ukrainian footballer who played as a midfielder for FC Zhetysu in the Kazakhstan Premier League.
Career[edit]
He moved to Kharkiv from Metalurh Donetsk during the 2008 summer transfer season. On 9 July 2009 he signed a two-year contract with Chornomorets Odessa.[1]
On 8 June 2016, Kasyanov signed for Zhetysu.[2]
External links[edit]

FC Kharkiv Official Website Profile
Artem Kasyanov at FFU
Soccerway Profile

References[edit]

^ Артем Касьянов подписал контракт с “Черноморцем” (in Russian). Chornomorets official website. 9 July 2009. Retrieved 9 July 2009. 
^ “”Жетысу» заключил контракт с Касьяновым”. fc-zhetisu.kz (in Russian). FC Zhetysu. 8 June 2016. Retrieved 8 June 2016. 

This biographical article related to a Ukrainian association football midfielder born in the 1980s is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Thirteen Bullets

Thirteen Bullets

cover to the novel

Author
David Wellington

Cover artist
Barbara Sturman

Country
United States

Language
English

Series
David Wellington’s Vampire series

Genre
Horror

Publisher
brokentype

Publication date

August 2006 (online)

Media type
ebook

Pages
336

ISBN
0-307-38143-9

OCLC
76166945

Dewey Decimal

813/.6 22

LC Class
PS3623.E468 A613 2007

Followed by
99 Coffins

Thirteen Bullets is a vampire novel by David Wellington, published in serial online in March, 2006.

Contents

1 Plot introduction
2 Vampire nature in Thirteen Bullets
3 Release details
4 Reception
5 References
6 External links

Plot introduction[edit]
Thirteen Bullets takes place in Pennsylvania in the year 2003, in a setting similar to the real world, but where vampires and other supernatural forces are rare but accepted phenomena. It is widely believed that vampires were all but wiped out twenty years ago by Special Deputy Jameson Arkeley. The last vampire still in existence, Justinia Malvern, long imprisoned in a nearly abandoned sanitarium, has somehow managed to bestow her vampiric curse to the outside world and is working to free herself of human confinment. Pennsylvania State Trooper Laura Caxton is assigned to assist Arkeley hunt down the vampires running loose in rural Pennsylvania.
Vampire nature in Thirteen Bullets[edit]

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The vampires in David Wellington’s novel seem to lose all their human appearances once turned. Their ears become pointed, their hair falls out, all teeth become wickedly sharp, and skin color always becomes pale white, regardless of ethnicity and pigmentation in life. The vampire must remain in a coffin during the day, as their bodies literally die each sunrise, and flesh melts into a noxious fluid, with dead skin and maggots. They are put together when dusk comes, thus getting a new body at night. Physical damage, such as mangled ears, is repaired each morning, but atrophy due to blood-starvation is not.
The method of transferring the curse is very different from the “traditional” way. To transfer the curse one must accept the vampire’s invitation to undeath, and then kill one’s self to be reborn.
Vampires also have the power to r

Development of Windows Vista

Part of a series on

Windows Vista

New features

Overview
Technical and core system
Security and safety
Networking technologies
I/O technologies
Management and administration
Removed features
Vista vs. XP

Other articles

Editions
Development history
Criticism
Mojave Experiment

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Development of Windows Vista occurred over the span of five and a half years, starting in earnest in May 2001,[1] prior to the release of Microsoft’s Windows XP operating system, and continuing until November 2006.
Microsoft originally expected to ship the new version sometime late in 2003 as a minor step between Windows XP (codenamed “Whistler”) and Windows 7 (codenamed “Blackcomb” and “Vienna”). Vista’s original codename, “Longhorn”, was an allusion to this plan: While Whistler and Blackcomb are large ski resorts in British Columbia, Longhorn is the name of a bar between the two mountains that Whistler’s visitors pass to reach Blackcomb.
Gradually, Windows “Longhorn” assimilated many of the important new features and technologies slated for “Blackcomb”, resulting in the release date being pushed back a few times. Many of Microsoft’s developers were also re-tasked with improving the security of Windows XP. Faced with ongoing delays and concerns about feature creep, Microsoft announced on August 27, 2004 that it was making significant changes. “Longhorn” development basically started afresh, building on the Windows Server 2003 codebase, and re-incorporating only the features that would be intended for an actual operating system release. Some previously announced features, such as WinFS and NGSCB, were dropped or postponed.
After “Longhorn” was named Windows Vista in mid-2005, an unprecedented beta-test program was started which involved hundreds of thousands of volunteers and companies. Between September 2005 and October 2006, Microsoft released regular Community Technology Previews (CTP) to beta testers, and two release candidates to the general public. Development of Windows Vista came to a conclusion with the November 8, 2006 announcement of its completion by co-president of Windows development, Jim Allchin.

Contents

1 2002: Early development

1.1 Milestone 2
1.2 Milestone 3

2 2003 and early 2004: New technology

2.1 Milestone 4
2.2 Milestone 5
2.3 Milestone 6
2.4 Milestone 7

3 Mid-2004 to Mid-2005: Development “reset”

3.1 Longhorn “D1” or Milestone 8/9

4 Mid-2005 to November 2006: Windows Vista

4.1 Beta 1
4.2 Community Technology Prev

Kobiljačić

Kobiljačić

family

Estates
Sopoštica

Founded
Before 1349 (1349)

Dissolution
1434 (1434)

The Kobiljačić (Serbian Cyrillic: Кобиљачићи) was a family in the Trebinje region whose members were mentioned in the period between 1349 and 1434, mostly involving orchestrated thefts on the territory of the Republic of Ragusa. The most known member, Vukosav, was a local magnate in the service of Pavle Radenović of the Kingdom of Bosnia, and was mentioned several times in Ragusan complaints.

Contents

1 History
2 Connection to Miloš Obilić
3 See also
4 References
5 Further reading

History[edit]
In the Middle Ages, the Trebinje Hinterland (Trebinjska Zagora) was an important center, which was often mentioned from 1325 and on. It was part of the župa (county) of Popovo. Part of the border of the Popovo župa crossed the Trebinje Hinterland. The Kobiljačić family is known to have lived in the Hinterland and had estates in Popovo and other places in the Trebinje region.[1]
Vojislav Kobiljačić is mentioned as having sold cattle in Ragusa (Dubrovnik) in 1349.[2] The family is mentioned in 1362.[3] In the beginning of 1373, Vojislav was mentioned with his son Mrkočela, and the following Kobiljačići: Vukosav and his son Stanihna, Novak and his son Mladen and brother Bjelica.[2] The Kobiljačić are believed to have been called Kobilić (Кобилић) and Kobilanović (Кобилановић), as well.[1] In 1390, a “Kobilić” is mentioned as the knez (duke) of Župa.[4] Bjelinče Kobiljačić and his nobles from the hinterland are mentioned in 1412–13.[2]
Vukosav (Вукосав Кобиљачић; fl. 1397–1413) was a nobleman in Trebinje in the service of Pavle Radenović (fl. 1381–d. 1415), a magnate of the Kingdom of Bosnia. When Pavle Radenović issued a charter for the rights of Ragusan merchants to trade freely on his land (1397),[5] the three witnesses, “from the maritime (pomorje)”, were Vukosav Kobiljačić, Ljubiša Bogdančić and Vukosav Poznanović.[6] Vukosav was present in a number of complaints filed in Ragusa, such as one time when he stole cattle in Začula.[2] In September 1412, a Priboje complained to the Ragusan court that he had found out who stole his items and that the thieves were some peasants of Vukosav Kobiljačić, and the Ragusan court intervened.[7] In 1413, Vukosav wrote to the Ragusan knez (count) Simko about the theft that his people had done in Zaton, a Ragusan territory.[8][9] A

Eric Ward

Eric Ward may refer to:

Eric Ward (quarterback) (born 1987), gridiron football quarterback
Eric Ward (wide receiver) (born 1990), American football wide receiver
Eric Ward (The O.C.)
Eric Ward (Australian footballer) (1913–2010), Australian rules footballer
Eric Ward (hurler) in 2009 Inter-Provincial Hurling Championship
Eric Richard Ward, founder of NetPOST and URLwire

This disambiguation page lists articles about people with the same name. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.

Code page 1103

Code page 1103, also known as CP1103,[1] or SF7DEC,[2] is an IBM code page number assigned to the Finnish variant of DEC’s National Replacement Character Set (NRCS).[3][4] The 7-bit character set was introduced for DEC’s computer terminal systems, starting with the VT200 series in 1983, but is also used by IBM for their DEC emulation. Similar but not identical to the series of ISO 646 character sets, the character set is a close derivation from ASCII with only nine code points differing.
Code page layout[edit]
Legend:

  Alphabetic
  Control character
  Numeric digit
  Punctuation

  Extended punctuation
  Graphic character
  International
  Undefined

Code page 1103 (DEC NRCS Finnish)[1]

_0
_1
_2
_3
_4
_5
_6
_7
_8
_9
_A
_B
_C
_D
_E
_F

 
0_
 
NUL
0000
0
SOH
0001
1
STX
0002
2
ETX
0003
3
EOT
0004
4
ENQ
0005
5
ACK
0006
6
BEL
0007
7
BS
0008
8
HT
0009
9
LF
000A
10
VT
000B
11
FF
000C
12
CR
000D
13
SO
000E
14
SI
000F
15

 
1_
 
DLE
0010
16
DC1
0011
17
DC2
0012
18
DC3
0013
19
DC4
0014
20
NAK
0015
21
SYN
0016
22
ETB
0017
23
CAN
0018
24
EM
0019
25
SUB
001A
26
ESC
001B
27
FS
001C
28
GS
001D
29
RS
001E
30
US
001F
31

 
2_
 
SP
0020
32
!
0021
33

0022
34
#
0023
35
$
0024
36
%
0025
37
&
0026
38

0027
39
(
0028
40
)
0029
41
*
002A
42
+
002B
43
,
002C
44

002D
45
.
002E
46
/
002F
47

 
3_
 
0
0030
48
1
0031
49
2
0032
50
3
0033
51
4
0034
52
5
0035
53
6
0036
54
7
0037
55
8
0038
56
9
0039
57
:
003A
58
;
003B
59
<
003C
60
=
003D
61
>
003E
62
?
003F
63

 
4_
 
@
0040
64
A
0041
65
B
0042
66
C
0043
67
D
0044
68
E
0045
69
F
0046
70
G
0047
71
H
0048
72
I
0049
73
J
004A
74
K
004B
75
L
004C
76
M
004D
77
N
004E
78
O
004F
79

 
5_
 
P
0050
80
Q
0051
81
R
0052
82
S
0053
83
T
0054
84
U
0055
85
V
0056
86
W
0057
87
X
0058
88
Y
0059
89
Z
005A
90
Ä
00C4
91
Ö
00D6
92
Å
00C5
93
Ü
00DC
94
_
005F
95

 
6_
 
é
00E9
96
a
0061
97
b
0062
98
c
0063
99
d
0064
100
e
0065
101
f
0066
102
g
0067
103
h
0068
104
i
0069
105
j
006A
106
k
006B
107
l
006C
108
m
006D
109
n
006E
110
o
006F
111

 
7_
 
p
0070
112
q
0071
113
r
0072
114
s
0073
115
t
0074
116
u
0075
117
v
0076
118
w
0077
119
x
0078
120
y
0079
121
z
007A
122
ä
00E4
123
ö
00F6
124
å
00E5
125
ü
00FC
126
DEL
007F
127

_0
_1
_2
_3
_4
_5
_6
_7
_8
_9
_A
_B
_C
_D
_E
_F

See also[edit]

Code page 1106 (very similar Swedish code page differing only in one cod

Overseas Telecommunications Veterans Association

The Overseas Telecommunications Veterans Association (also abbreviated OTVA) was founded in Sydney, Australia in 1956 by long-serving employees and ex-employees of Amalgamated Wireless Australasia Limited (AWA), Cable & Wireless and Australia’s then international telecommunications carrier, the Overseas Telecommunications Commission (OTC), which had itself been established a decade earlier by combining the international radio and cable assets of AWA and C&W respectively.
The Australian Government merged OTC with Telecom Australia in 1992 to form the Australian and Overseas Telecommunications Corporation Limited (AOTC), subsequently renamed Telstra Corporation Limited, but the OTVA continues to hold regular meetings, special interest events and reunions every year. OTVA celebrated its Golden Jubilee in November 2006.

Contents

1 OTVA objectives
2 OTVA Newsletter
3 Highlights from OTVA’s history
4 Notes
5 References
6 External links

OTVA objectives[edit]

To promote and protect artifacts and archive materials relating to Australia’s international telecommunications history and, in particular, the archives of the Overseas Telecommunications Commission (subsequently Corporation) (OTC) and its antecedents, as well as related materials collected by that organization during its existence.
To provide opportunities for people with employment experience in international telecommunications, or with an interest in Australia’s international telecommunications history, to meet in a social environment for fellowship and discussion of matters of mutual interest. In particular, such matters which are deemed to hold some historical value for researchers and special interest groups and which may therefore be contributed to the OTVA Newsletter.

OTVA Newsletter[edit]
Published by the association, featuring input on a wide range of matters relating to the international telecommunications industry by members and guest contributors. Four issues per year are distributed to members, as well as state libraries and the National Library, Canberra. The first issue was published in 1972 and all are available on CD.
Highlights from OTVA’s history[edit]
On 19 July 1956, OTVA was founded with the adoption of its constitution and election of officers. The first social function was held on 14 December in the form of a “Buffet Tea” held at the State Ballroom, Market St, Sydney. In 1957, Victoria Association was formed in Melbourne. R. Freeman was elected as President a

Live at the Fruitmarket

This article does not cite any sources. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (November 2009) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Live at The Fruitmarket

Live album by The Delgados

Recorded
Fruitmarket, Glasgow on 20 January 2001

Genre
Indie rock

Length
69:29

Label
Chemikal Underground

The Delgados chronology

The Great Eastern
(2000)
Live at The Fruitmarket
(2001)
Hate
(2002)

Live at The Fruitmarket is a live album by The Delgados, recorded on 20 January 2001 at the Fruitmarket, Glasgow. It was the last show of the Great Eastern tour.
Track listing[edit]
All songs originally appeared on The Great Eastern except where otherwise noted.

“Knowing When to Run”
“Everything Goes Around the Water” – from Peloton
“Reasons for Silence”
“Aye Today”
“Don’t Stop” – from Peloton
“Pull the Wires from the Wall” – from Peloton
“Witness”
“The Weaker Argument Defeats the Stronger” – from Peloton
“Blackpool” – from Peloton
“American Trilogy”
“Make Your Move”
“The Past that Suits You Best”
“No Danger”
“13 Gliding Principles”

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The Delgados

Stewart Henderson
Emma Pollock
Paul Savage
Alun Woodward

Studio albums

Domestiques
Peloton
The Great Eastern
Hate
Universal Audio

Other albums

Live at the Fruitmarket
The Complete BBC Peel Sessions

This 2000s indie pop album-related article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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